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Group calls on Iowa lawmakers to cross invoice eliminating intercourse abuse statutes of limitations

A statewide child advocacy group is calling on Iowa lawmakers to pass law that removes both civil and criminal statutes of limitations for child sexual abuse. Child USAdvocacy officials said Senate Record 572 would expose hidden predators. Kathryn Robb, the group’s executive director, said Iowa’s current statutes of limitations are among the worst in the country when it comes to protecting children and punishing abusers. “Iowa will likely get an F,” said Robb. Under current Iowa law, victims have until 33 years of age to file criminal charges, but only four years after discovering they have been molested – to file a civil lawsuit. Senate Act 572 would allow victims to prosecute or bring charges at any age, and would allow adults who were molested as children a three-year window to file claims. Sister organization ChildUSA says Iowa is one of only eight states that haven’t eliminated some or all of criminal statutes of limitations. If the bill is passed, Iowa, along with 12 other states, would lift civil statutes of limitations. Robb said the bill would identify previously unknown predators for the public, shift the cost of the abuse to the perpetrators, and educate the public about the extent of the problem. She said she was one of 1 in 5 girls and 1 in 13 boys to experience sexual abuse before she was 18. “Why should the perpetrators be protected over time, but the survivors suffer in the long run?” She said. “I mean, if you think that way, Iowa really has to respond.” On Sunday night, KCCI contacted Iowa Insurance Associates and the Iowa Defense Counsel Association, the two organizations that had registered against Senate Record 572. As of Sunday evening we have not received any replies. The bill was passed by a Senate committee earlier this month, erasing the first so-called legislative “funnel”. Sen. Brad Zaun, R-Urbandale, the bill’s floor manager, said there was still no schedule as to when or if the bill could make it to the Senate, despite meeting with Senate Majority Leader Jack Whitver, R-Ankeny, Will speak in conversation The bill would also have to pass the Iowa House of Representatives before it gets to Governor Kim Reynolds’ desk.

A statewide child advocacy group is calling on Iowa lawmakers to pass law to remove both civil and criminal statutes of limitations for child sexual abuse.

Child USAdvocacy group leaders said Senate Act 572 would expose hidden predators. Kathryn Robb, the group’s executive director, said Iowa’s current statutes of limitations are among the worst in the country when it comes to protecting children and punishing abusers.

“Iowa will likely get an F,” said Robb.

Under current Iowa law, victims have until 33 years of age to file criminal charges, but only four years after discovering they have been molested – to file a civil lawsuit. Senate Act 572 would allow victims to prosecute or bring charges at any age, and it would allow adults who were molested as children a three-year window to file claims.

According to sister organization ChildUSA, Iowa is one of only eight states that haven’t removed some or all of the criminal statutes of limitations. If passed, Iowa, along with 12 other states, would lift civil statutes of limitations.

Robb said the bill would identify previously unknown predators for the public, shift the cost of the abuse to the perpetrators, and educate the public about the extent of the problem. She said she was one of 1 in 5 girls and 1 in 13 boys to experience sexual abuse before she was 18.

“Why should the perpetrators be protected over time while the survivors suffer in the long run?” She said. “I mean, if you think about it like that, Iowa really has to react.”

On Sunday evening, KCCI contacted Iowa Insurance Associates and the Iowa Defense Counsel Association, the two organizations that were registered against Senate Record 572. We did not receive any replies until Sunday evening.

The bill was passed by a Senate committee earlier this month, erasing the first so-called legislative “funnel”.

Senator Brad Zaun, R-Urbandale, the bill’s floor manager, said there was still no schedule as to when or if the bill could make it to the Senate floor, despite speaking to Senate Majority Leader Jack Whitver, R-Ankeny becomes. in an effort to move it forward.

The bill would also have to pass through the Iowa House of Representatives before it could get to Governor Kim Reynolds’ desk.

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